A Little Ditty

In praise of this spiritual dance with Mick, Keith and His Holiness

A Little Ditty in Honour of the braver aspects of Mick, Keith and the Rolling Stones I’ll write you both a little ditty seeing that have all aged so well, and escaped the deep ravine. It’s called keep your filthy socks off sweetie, and enjoy the eccentricities of divine aspect – or not.

We all know Mick engages in a little meditation or two Have ever you met the incomparable Shantideva?
I hope to see you when you really take your clothes off In emptiness

My divine wisdom eye is always on you
We shan’t mention Nagarjuna
Or did you first understand non-attachment from He?
Micky Micky Mick
so cute with that little tush of yours
that keeps waggling
for peaceful absorption
Did you know Buddha always knows when to hide your unfaithful aspect To keep you sustained in spiritual faith
Swippie Swippie Swoo
You raised us out of the drudgery of divorce
vanquishing our nervous tensions
that hid in horror from commercial realities
and buried our happiness and freedom aspect in mundane torture
We waited for a friend and you came
Ta for that!
Who said the Rolling Stones didn’t understand the downfalls of desire? Anyway, anyway gotta go
Sweet dreams forever and ever and ever

 

Copyright © Vanessa Pollock

The Union of Bliss and Emptiness

The emptiness[1] of love[2], of life[3], of enlightenment[4]. Can words really express this ultimate reality? On Sunday night, my Guru[5] spoke to me in a liberating[6], and intoxicating[7] way. Suggestive, transformative, uplifting, heartbreakingly beautiful. My mind sings when He[8] is its focus. Voidness[9] glistens, bubbling away, dissolving that which is harmful, revealing the pure essence of phenomena, its blissful heart.

After spending hours in meditation, my mind soothed and quieted into a blissful void quiescence that left me transported to a pure realm of bliss and purity, I prepared to go to bed. Having some tea and yoghurt, I listened to the evening news close to midnight, before preparing for bed and more absorption. My Guru appeared, listening with a loving heart and mind, he transfixed my vision. In an ultimate state we danced together. The many aspects of emptiness revealed, unraveling the ordinary state of perception, erasing suffering completely. After, united and spent, I was left to observe the traces of my own impurity and to recognize so clearly how such attitudes of hatred, anger and displeasure  tear away at lasting happiness, causing nothing but pain, misery and suffering. How clear this realization was. Truly, to be absorbed in emptiness, in ultimate bodhicitta[10], this is where real happiness lies. To be united in peace with one’s master, this is the goal of life itself. Nothing can match such peace, or the purity, the ultimate state of being for me, and perhaps others as well.

[1] Emptiness is the true state of reality, the mode in which all phenomena exist.

[2] To love another being means wishing them to be happy. To strive for the happiness of others.

[3] Life means to have heat.

[4] Enlightenment is the state where one has overcome and extinguished all faults of the body, speech and mind and achieved the highest state of perfection by developing the body, speech and mind to their ultimate state of purity and perfection.

[5] Guru is a spiritual teacher, a being that has fully perfected him or herself to the state of everlasting happiness, peace and freedom from suffering. An authentic Guru is a being that has achieved the ultimate state of enlightenment.

[6] Liberating means to free one from all forms of suffering.

[7] Intoxicating means to abide in bliss.

[8] He is Buddha. A being that has achieved Buddhahood, the ultimate state of peace, purity and perfection. Fully Awakened, Fully Enlightened, Transcendent One.

[9] Voidness means that all phenomena lack inherent existence. All phenomena are empty of inherent existence.

[10] Bodhicitta is the mind that aspires to and engages in the path to enlightenment.

Copyright © Vanessa Anne Walsh 2015

The Buddha’s Begging Bowl

Four Sights of Birth, Aging, Sickness and Death

The word ‘diet’ has several different meanings. The Collins Dictionary defines it to be ‘the food and drink one regularly consumes’. An alternative to that is the definition given in A Kind Diet, which states that diet is “a way of living, or thinking, a day’s journey.”

The time we spend on shopping for food, planning our meals, thinking about what it is we like and do not like to eat and what adhere’s to the medical profession’s recommendations surrounding the subject of diet is indeed considerable. We spend many of our waking hours working out this basic survival function and the money that goes towards keeping this human body of ours in good shape and healthy is enormous. Having thought about that, and briefly looked into some popular diet trends that are heavily advertised on local media, I thought to divert away from the consumerist approach to food for a moment and consider the Buddha‘s teaching on non-attachment.

One symbol the Buddha employed as a means to convey his teaching on non-attachment was the use of an alms or begging bowl. Alms are charitable donations of money or goods to the poor or needy, yet the Buddha was neither of these things, so why bother with the use of a begging bowl? The alms bowl is considered to be symbol of the monastic life or life of a renunciate, and an aid to the life of the holy and those interested in seeking the truth. Once made from clay, which broke easily, the bowls were then forged with iron for added durability.

Specifically, the alms bowl refers to the time in the Buddha’s life just before he attained enlightenment, when a young girl, named Sujata offered the Buddha a bowl of milk rice. Although the Buddha was practicing the austerity of eating only a little food at the time, he realised that to achieve the final stages of enlightenment, he would need to partake of the offering of rice from Sujuta. After partaking of the meal, one tradition states that the Buddha then threw away the small amount of food left in that bowl to symbolise the Buddha’s complete non-attachment to material possessions. Another legend tells the story that the Buddha threw away the begging bowl itself into the river to symbolise the mind of non-attachment.

The point of all this is to question the validity, or lack thereof, of the attached state of mind itself. The mind of attachment is traditionally explained in Buddhist philosophy to be a mind that exaggerates the good qualities of an object and ignores it’s perhaps less apparent flaws. One apparent flaw in all objects of this world is their impermanent nature. Of the Four Seals of Buddhism, the first is that all compounded phenomena are suffering. The second is that all contaminated objects are impermanent. At Daily Buddhism, stained or contaminated actions are explained as follows;

The use of the word stained or contaminated refers to actions, emotions or thoughts that are stained by selfish attachment, or by hatred, greed or ignorance.

When we are motivated by an attached state of mind, and cling onto material possessions, relationships or even ideas, we fail to recognise the objects intransigent and impermanent nature. That does not mean to say that we are not in need of food and other such things to ensure our survival and good health. It does indicate however, that having a more open and loving outlook towards other beings is more important. Given the violent nature of our human history and past, the gross lack of regard for the lives of others and destruction of the environment and other species, it is most definitely time to act to lighten our environmental footprint and reduce our grasping towards the status symbols of the wealthy. Instead of spending big bucks on expensive living and chasing the latest fad or diet trend, I suggest that there is much more happiness and satisfaction to be gained and maintained from living a more moderate and simple lifestyle with a focus more upon ensuring a happy state of mind. If we spent more time ensuring our mind itself is in a positive and peaceful state, through the practice of meditation, this would naturally lead to a more balanced and healthy lifestyle which would not only benefit the practitioner, but others on the planet as well.

I will leave you here with a totally different interpretation of the word diet, from one of the founders of Buddhist literature and Mahayana thought. The great Nargajuna once wrote of the Five Diets being;

The Diet of Concentration

The Course Diet

The Inner Diet

The Diet of Touch and

The Diet of Volition.

Whilst I am no expert, I would say that the Buddha with his Alms or Begging Bowl is an important symbol of peace, happiness and prosperity to keep in mind as we go about our daily habit of foraging for food, drink and clothing, if in the least to try to minimise our ever-expanding impact on this precious planet.

Copyright © Vanessa Anne Walsh 2011